'What works' reports

Recommended reading on family and whānau violence

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'What works' reports

 

 

This section contains reports which review research: on different types of violence, the impacts of violence and evidence-informed strategies to prevent and respond to violence ("what works").

Aotearoa New Zealand

Fanslow, J. L. (2005)
Beyond zero tolerance: Key issues and future directions for family violence work in New Zealand
Wellington: Families Commission.

Mardani, J. (2010)
Preventing child neglect in New Zealand: A public health assessment of the evidence, current approach and best practice guidance
Wellington: Office of the Children's Commissioner.

International

What Works to Prevent Violence evidence reviews
What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls Programme, UK Department for International Development

Niolon, P. H., Kearns, M., Dills, J., Rambo, K., Irving, S., Armstead, T., & Gilbert, L. (2017).
Preventing intimate partner violence across the lifespan: A technical package of programs, policies, and practices
Atlanta, GA: Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
This technical package represents a select group of strategies based on the best available evidence to help communities and states sharpen their focus on prevention activities with the greatest potential to prevent intimate partner violence (IPV) and its consequences across the lifespan.

Fortson, B. L., Klevens, J., Merrick, M. T., Gilbert, L. K., & Alexander, S. P. (2016)
Preventing child abuse and neglect: A technical package for policy, norm, and programmatic activities
Atlanta, GA: Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
This technical package represents a select group of strategies based on the best available evidence to help prevent child abuse and neglect.

Hillis S. D., Mercy, J. A., Saul, J., Gleckel, J., Abad, N., & Kress, H. (2015)
THRIVES: A global technical package to prevent violence against children
Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
THRIVES represents a select group of complementary strategies that reflect the best available evidence to help countries sharpen their focus on priorities with the greatest potential to reduce violence against children.

Basile, K. C., and others (2016)
STOP SV: A technical package to prevent sexual violence
Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Ellsberg, M., Arango, D. .J., Morton, M., Gennari, F., Kiplesund, S., Contreras, M., & Watts, C. (2015)
Prevention of violence against women and girls: What does the evidence say?
The Lancet, 385(9977): 1555–1566
This paper reviews the evidence for interventions to reduce the prevalence and incidence of violence against women and girls.

Futures Without Violence (2015)
Safe, healthy and ready to learn: Policy recommendations to ensure children thrive in supportive communities free from violence and trauma
San Francisco, CA: Futures Without Violence.

Michau, L., Horn, J., Bank, A., Dutt, M., & Zimmerman, C. (2015)
Prevention of violence against women and girls: Lessons from practice
The Lancet, 385(9978), 1672-1684.

Global Programme to Prevent Violence against Women and Girls project (2014)
What works to prevent violence against women and girls
Pretoria, South Africa: What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls Global Programme.

Arango, D. J., Morton, M., Gennari, F., Kiplesund, S., & Ellsberg, M. (2014)
Interventions to prevent or reduce violence against women and girls: A systematic review of reviews
Women's Voice, Agency, & Participation Research Series, no.10; World Bank. 
This systematic review of reviews synthesises evidence on the effects of VAWG prevention interventions.

Hamby, S., & Grych, J. H. (2012)
The web of violence: Exploring connections among different forms of interpersonal violence and abuse
New York: Springer Verlag.

Heise, L. L. (2011)
What works to prevent partner violence? An evidence overview
London: Strive.

World Health Organization/London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (2010)
Preventing intimate partner and sexual violence against women: Taking action and generating evidence
Geneva: World Health Organization.

World Health Organization & John Moores University (2009)
Violence prevention: The evidence
Geneva: World Health Organization.
This series of briefings for advocates, programme designers and implementers and others summarises the evidence for the effectiveness of strategies for preventing violence: (1) increasing safe, stable and nurturing relationships between children and their parents and caregivers; (2) developing life skills in children and adolescents; (3) reducing availability and harmful use of alcohol; (4) reducing access to guns, knives and pesticides; (5) promoting gender equality; (6) changing cultural norms that support violence; and (7) victim identification, care and support.

Butchart, A., Harvey, A. P., Mian, M., Fürniss, T., & Kahane, T. (2006)
Preventing child maltreatment: A guide to taking action and generating evidence
Geneva: World Health Organization.

Butchart, A. (2004)
Preventing violence: A guide to implementing the recommendations of the World Report on Violence and Health
Geneva: World Health Organization.

Krug, E. G., Dahlberg, L. L., Mercy, J. A., Zwi, A. B., & Lozano, R. (Eds.) (2002)
World report on violence and health
Geneva: World Health Organization.

Choose another section

Top five reads
Definitions
Statistics 
Impacts of violence
Conceptual models
- Tangata whenua
- Pacific communities
- Asian communities
- Gendered analysis
- Public health models
Risk and protective factors
(what 'causes' family violence?)
'What works' reports

Victim/survivors' voices
Primary prevention
Community mobilisation
Integrated family violence system
Intervention
- Intimate partner violence and child abuse and neglect  
- By population group
- By sector
Co-occurring issues
Evaluation
Further reading

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